The King City Highlands

The King City Highlands

A 55+ Adult Community

The King City Highlands

A 55+ Adult Community

Highlands Landscape Renovation Projects

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The ALC is still working up the list of spaces around the common areas of the Highlands that are in need of some freshening-up. As you can see from the annotated map, the list is long — and varied. We're also working up a prioritized list for the future, as well as soliciting proposals to help with the budget-planning process.
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The Dickson Triangle

The Dickson Triangle is on the south side of Dickson Street, between the 130th Avenue and 129th Terrace intersections. It's about 0.10 acres in area, and is now just open turf grass, punctuated by several piles of wood chips where four mature — but diseased — trees used to be. The trees were removed in December, 2019, and begun the process of reimagining this space, which is among the first views folks see when they enter the Highlands.
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The plan is to re-grade the space, creating new berms and sight lines. The turf area will be greatly reduced, but will have added curves winding among the planted areas. Those planted areas will have small to medium-sized flowering trees, surrounded by and accented by lots of Pacific Northwest native shrubs and other accent plants.
In addition, there will be non-living elements, such as boulders, dry streams, and snags to offer other interesting visual features.
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The new Dickson Triangle space will offer four-season attractiveness, featuring varied colors in foliage, flowers, bark and surroundings. The plants will also be labeled with small identification signs, so visitors can learn more about what's been planted.

A complete set of descriptions for the plants in the Dickson Triangle renovation can be viewed in the PDF below.

Peachvale-Wimbledon Walking Path

The Peachvale-Wimbledon walking path (wait, did you even know that there WAS such a path?) has a thin strip of HOA common-area space on the west side of the concrete walkway. The strip is all of about 6' wide, and some 420' long (on the north-south leg of the path). There's another 3'x100' strip on the east-west leg of the path as well.

On the north-south leg, there were some dead and dying juniper shrubs, and lots and lots of invasive English ivy. Those dead shrubs and the ivy have been mechanically removed, with follow-up herbicide treatments on the newly-sprouted ivy.

Today, there's a lot of open, exposed soil, which slopes downward from west to east, creating a bit of a potential erosion problem.
The ALC has been working on a plan to renovate this long, narrow strip of space. Among the things that have been done so far:
  • We've had a sunset maple tree in the corner girdled and turned into a snag, for visual interest and perching potential.
  • Small boulders (from a nearby resident's yard) have been brought in and tastefully arranged.
  • A few Lemon cypress shrubs have been transplanted into the area from other spaces around the Highlands. These shrubs will now be able to grow to their full potential, without the need for constant shearing.
  • A drip line has been installed to provide irrigation to some of those Lemon cypress shrubs, with water provided by a neighbor.
The ALC's Landscape Renovation Coordinators are still working up a design and soliciting proposals from service providers for further work on the Peachvale-Wimbledon Walking Path area.

Dickson Walking Path at 128th Avenue

Once upon a time, there were two mature trees in the small spaces on either side of 128th Avenue at the Dickson walking path crossing. Those trees caused some problems with the infrastructure, and were removed several years ago. More recently, most of the remaining roots were ground out, leaving piles of wood chips at the two locations. Not very attractive.
Some considerations for updates to those two spots include:
  • Add a small tree or flowering shrub
  • Adding boulders, perhaps including a "puddle stone" with a depression to hold water and act as a bird bath
Any new plantings in those spaces will need to be located sufficiently away from the buried cables in those areas.